Monthly Articles

Summer Clam Bake

1-IMG_6067Even though we don’t live near the ocean, I wish we did. I miss the sound of the waves, the smell of the salt air and the plethora of fresh sea food. I would move back in a heartbeat if I wasn’t so terrified that one day a huge earthquake will hit and the coastline will sink.  So, summer time usually means a trip to the coast to say a quick “hello” to the ocean and gorge myself at a restaurant on the Harbour Quay.

This summer, the trip will not be possible, so we are doing the next best thing and having a clambake. Without clams, since we couldn’t find any to purchase, and we baked it in a roaster oven instead of a pit in the sand. This is basically the equivalent of someone who gives a recipe 5 stars on allrecipes.com but changed the whole thing – “Yes, I loved this recipe for deep fried cod, but I made a few changes and used tilapia instead of the cod. I also chose not to deep fry it since I’m trying to be healthier and chose to wrap it in parchment paper with a slice of lemon on top. Was fantastic! Will definitely make it again.”

The history of the clambake dates back to pre-colonization when the First Nations people along the coastlines would cook their seafood in large pits dug in the sand. Hot rocks would be layered at the bottom of a pit, topped with seaweed, clams, mussels and Sebastian’s ancestors (or predecessors) depending on where you place Ariel and her mermaid family on the timeline of evolution, and topped with another layer of seaweed. 

When we think of clambakes, we also think of beer. And homemade potato chips. And pie. Cherry pie to be exact. Because we are obviously super wholesome people. Warrant kinda wholesome.

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And we did them all to perfection. Best and easiest dinner ever! Pinkie swear. 

Menu:

Decorations, aka. ambiance:

It was a lot of fun and easier than we expected. We will definitely be planning a clambake 2.0 in the near future.

And, while we’re speaking of parties, don’t forget to check out our Top 10 Most Interesting People at a Party – R. Dolly.

 

DIY

Painting Glasses Like a Boss

3-IMG_6052Last year, C. Dolly brought me back a beautiful wineglass from her drunkfest  wine tour. Due to our well documented crow nature, it has managed to fascinate us both for a period of a year. When we decided to do a clam bake, we thought it was the perfect opportunity to put our painting skills to the test with some awesome, one of a kind painted glasses. 

After much googling, youtubing and scratching our nether regions, we decided to take the advice of Martha Stewart, because she is our crafting queen. When in doubt, we always ask, “WWMSD – What Would Martha Stewart Do?” She would encourage us to buy her tried and true product, that’s what!

Martha Stewart, Multi-Surface Acrylic Craft Paint was the answer for our overwhelmed brain. There are so many different options and conflicting advice available on the internet and just as many pros and cons to all of them. We decided that paint rather than pens would give us more of the texture and artistic look we were going for. It was also available in a much wider selection of colours than pens and would give us options to blend colours for different effects. So far we are happy with them and they have stood up to the scratch test, hand washing and the dishwasher in the top rack. 

Supplies:

  • Synthetic paint brushes, variety of sizes
  • Martha Stewart acrylic paint
  • Glasses of your choice, we chose stemless wine glasses and pilsner glasses
  • oven

Directions:

  1. Wash and dry glasses well to remove any film or oil that may be on them from handling
  2. Choose your colour palette and design. You can even tape a simple pattern on the inside of the glass if you’re unsure of your painting skills. If you’re painting something specific like cherry blossoms, or a tree, it would help to have the picture in front of you for reference (blossom count, colours, etc…)
  3. Let paint dry for at least an hour prior to heating in oven. 
  4. Place glasses on tray in cold oven. Heat to 350F and bake for 30 minutes. DO NOT REMOVE! 
  5. Open oven door a crack, and let glasses cool prior to removing. Do not forget about them and turn your oven on in the morning to make sausages for breakfast. If you do, turn the oven off and let the glasses sit in the oven until cold and then find something else to cook. – R.Dolly

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